Mohammad Asif spot-fixing appeal rejected in London

Asif was released from prison in May after serving half his sentence of 12 months for the fixing scandal that rocked the world of cricket. The seamer was among two other Pakistani players jailed after plot in a bowl deliberate no-balls during a test of the 2010 edition Lord against England was discovered during an undercover investigation by the now defunct News of the World.

Former Pakistan captain Salman Butt was jailed for 30 months, while fast bowelr Mohammad Amir was detained for six months in a young offenders’ institution. The three players were prevented from playing due to a five-year ban imposed by the International Cricket Council (ICC). Three judges of the Court of Appeal in London on Wednesday rejected an appeal by the Pakistan Cricket Mohammad Asif against his conviction for fixing point.

In their decision, the judges said they were “not satisfied that there are arguable grounds or otherwise, to attack the security of convictions of the applicant (Asif)”.
Mohammad Asif spot-fixing appeal rejected
“The repeated requests are rejected,” they added.

The fast bowler Asif, 30, was released from prison in May after serving half of a 12-month sentence for participating in a plot to bowl deliberate no-balls in a Test match against the England at Lord’s in 2010.

Former captain Salman Butt was jailed for 30 months, while promising young bowler Mohammad Aamer was detained for six months in a young offenders’ institution.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) administration has also banned the trio of cricket for five years.

Butt and Asif both defied the ban ICC Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), but the organization based in Lausanne in April rejected their appeals.

Point-fixing conspiracy, which was discovered by the late World News newspaper, was one of the biggest scandals to hit the cricket over the years and has also led to the conviction of their London-based agent.

The Court of Appeal dismissed challenges by Butt and Aamer against their sentences in November 2011.

In his ruling, Lord Chief Justice Igor Judge, the head of the judiciary in England and Wales, said the players had “betrayed the country where they had the honor to represent and betrayed the sport that had given them their distinction – and of course betrayed all the very many followers of the game throughout the world. “

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